SAIC of PPD Vic Erevia President Obama

SAIC of PPD Vic Erevia President Obama

Friday, November 9, 2012

Secret Service re: Mitt Romney and President Obama

On November 08, 2012 at 7:19 AM

How the Secret Service Said Goodbye to Mitt Romney


At some point, early Wednesday morning, when Gov. Mitt Romney and family were tucked into bed, a quiet call went out on the radio channel used by his Secret Service agents: "Javelin, Jockey details, all posts, discontinue."

Of all the indignities involved in losing a presidential race, none is more stark than the sudden emptiness of your entourage. The Secret Service detail guarding Governor Romney since Feb 1. stood down quickly. He had ridden in a 15-car motorcade to the Intercontinental Hotel in Boston for his concession speech. He rode in a single-car motorcade back across the Charles River to Belmont. His son, Tagg, did the driving.

There is no formal guideline for the Secret Service agents in this situation; it's up to the discretion of the detail leader, who usually consults with the local police to make sure that his protectee's home won't be overrun by protestors and supporters all of a sudden.

But the Service leaves quickly. No more motorcades. No more rope lines. No more bubbles. Familiar faces disappear, never to be seen again.

In 2008, agents offered to see John McCain back to his ranch in Sedona, but McCain insisted on saying his good byes in his suite at the Biltmore Hotel. The next morning, McCain was seen driving his own car to get groceries.
Had Romney won, everything would have been different. A full counter-assault team, "Hawkeye Javelin," was on stand-by in Boston, ready to supplement his detail. A team from the White House Communications Agency, which had been consulting with his informal transition team on secure space for intelligence briefings, was on hand too.

Romney has his family. When the race was close, agents would joke about the number of "j" words they'd need to come up with in order to give every one of his children, their wives, and all of their children code names. That's 29 people who would have received, if not protection, at least a protective survey and recommendations from the Service. Quietly, plans had already been put in place to assign protective details to all of them, just in case.

The Secret Service has had a hellish year. Not only has it been the busiest ever for the small agency, but it has been their most embarrassing since the assassination attempt on Ronald Reagan in 1981. April's prostitution in scandal in Cartegana, Colombia threatened to demoralize the entity in charge of safeguarding the democratic process right on the eve of their active phase; two conventions, major foreign trips for the president, the presidential debates, the United Nations General Assembly, the campaign season itself (with sometimes more than a thousand agents and officers changing locations daily). An Inspector General's report has concluded that agents did not jeopardize the president's safety, but having spent time with agents over these past few months, their morale has been flagging. The public mockery takes it toll, even on silent soldiers.

And yet, for everything they were confronted with, the Service did its job. Protectees were protected 100 percent of the time. Several assassination plots were nipped in the bud. Thousands of events were secured, perfectly. Results matter, as we learned Tuesday night.

Though no one in the Service was rooting one way or the other for any particular candidate, at least not to colleagues or publicly, not having to secure the Romney family means that agents who have been working 12 hours shifts for eight weeks straight can take some time off before the inauguration. Families of many more agents will get them home for Thanksgiving and Christmas.


Secret Service said to have foiled several assassination attempts on President Obama and Mitt Romney during the campaign, but report is under scrutiny

GQ author Marc Ambinder defended his reporting with a list of public-record assassination attempts but had few other details to offer. A Secret Service spokesperson said he was unfamiliar with Ambinder’s sources.

By Charlie Wells / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

President Obama and Mitt Romney may have had something much more serious to lose on this year’s campaign trail than the presidency: life itself.
A number of assassination plots were thwarted by Secret Service agents over the course of this campaign, according to one reporter, whose findings have come under scrutiny from the media in the wake of Tuesday’s election.
In an article about Romney’s intensive security detail written by GQ’s Marc Ambinder, the journalist said that in the Secret Service’s busiest year yet, “Several assassination plots were nipped in the bud.”
This claim was almost immediately questioned by members of the media, especially as Ambinder took to Twitter to suggest that more information might come out in a print edition of the article.

Politicker reached out to Secret Service spokesman Edwin Donovan for further details on the reported plots.
“We didn’t work with Marc Ambinder on that article, so I don’t know what his sourcing is,” Donovan told the publication.
When Politicker contacted the author, he eventually responded but without many juicy details.


“There was that guy who shot at the White House from across the ellipse, and then the soldiers arrested for plotting the assassination of the president and others,” Ambinder wrote, ticking off a list of public-record assassination attempts.

“I don’t know any details about any non-public attempts, if there were any,” he wrote.
Whether someone attempted to kill him as a presidential hopeful or not, Romney -- apparently known as “Javelin” by the Secret Service -- will return to post-candidate life without the massive security detail that followed his every move on the trail.
Obama, whose detail will, of course, continue, is known by the Service as “Renegade.”



Friday, November 2, 2012

Secret Service agent kills self amid affair probe

Secret Service agent kills self amid affair probe


By ALICIA A. CALDWELL
Associated Press – 2 hrs 45 mins ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — For nearly six years, a senior Secret Service agent kept his extramarital affair with a Mexican woman a secret from the agency responsible for protecting the president.

But in the wake of an embarrassing prostitution scandal involving 13 agents and officers, Rafael Prieto's secret was revealed by a fellow employee amid concerns that the Secret Service wasn't enforcing its rules consistently.

With an internal investigation ongoing, Prieto apparently committed suicide last week. That's according to people familiar with the matter. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss Prieto's death or the investigation, which they say has focused on whether Prieto violated agency rules that require disclosing relationships with foreigners.

They say Prieto, a married father, admitted the years-long relationship when confronted by investigators.

Source: Secret Service agent dead of apparent suicide

By Carol Cratty, CNN

updated 11:04 PM EDT, Thu November 1, 2012

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

• Rafael Prieto was a 20-year veteran of the Secret Service

• He was assigned to President Obama's protective detail

• Authorities were looking into a suspected long-term relationship with a foreign national

• A law enforcement source says his death last Saturday was an apparent suicide

Washington (CNN) -- A Secret Service agent suspected of having a romantic relationship with a Mexican woman is dead of an apparent suicide, a law enforcement official told CNN Thursday.

The source said Rafael Prieto, 48, was assigned to President Obama's protective detail.

The Secret Service confirmed Thursday that Prieto's death last Saturday is currently being investigated by the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, along with the medical examiner's office. No official determination of death has been made.

Prieto's access to Secret Service facilities had been suspended while authorities were looking into his apparently unreported and long-term relationship with a foreign national, the law enforcement official said.

"There is nothing to indicate that any classified or sensitive information was compromised as a result of this relationship," according to the source.

The official said Prieto was involved in an "administrative process" about his connection with the woman but that he was not under investigation by the Secret Service's Office of Professional Responsibility.

Prieto could have been in violation of Secret Service protocols if he had not informed superiors about a personal relationship with a foreign national. Such relationships came under a spotlight after agents sent to Cartagena, Colombia, in advance of President Obama's trip earlier this year spent time partying with prostitutes.

"Rafael Prieto had a distinguished 20-year career with the Secret Service that was marked by accomplishment, dedication, and friendships," said Secret Service spokesman Edwin Donovan. "The Secret Service is mourning the loss of a valued colleague."